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because_murica

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I had not seen it 100% confirmed anywhere until now (unless it was and I just missed it), Ed Krenz recently told Ford Authority that the "entire stack" on S650 will be locked down.

See article here:​
S650 FORD MUSTANG WILL BE MORE DIFFICULT FOR THIRD PARTIES TO TUNE
“Much more difficult,” Ford Mustang Chief Engineer Ed Krenz told Ford Authority Executive Editor, Alex Luft, in a recent interview when asked if it would be difficult for third parties to tune the S650 Ford Mustang. Krenz explained that the seventh-generation Mustang uses the automaker’s new Fully-Networked Vehicle (FNV) electrical architecture, which brings various benefits like over-the-air updates and much-needed cybersecurity to the iconic pony car, but it also largely locks down the vehicle from being tuned as well.​
As Ford Authority was the first to report back in December 2020, FoMoCo’s FNV electrical architecture has long been expected to make life more difficult for third party tuners in general, though that’s simply a byproduct of the automaker’s attempts to keep user data – and their vehicles – safe from ever-growing hacking threats. Krenz and other S650 engineers explained that the entire stack on the S650 is encrypted, including the ECU. This means that if the system detects a “break” in authentication, it will shut it down – or shut down components of the vehicle. So even if someone were to modify one of these engines, they wouldn’t be able to actually tune the car to take full advantage of it.​
However, Ford remains open to collaborating with tuners looking to modify vehicles like the S650, and this doesn’t prevent it from offering performance enhancements or tunes for the turbocharged Ford 2.3L I-4 EcoBoost or naturally-aspirated Ford 5.0L V8 Coyote itself, as it has been doing via Ford Performance for the Ford Explorer ST crossover, Ford Bronco SUV, and Ford Ranger pickup for some time now, as well as a offering supercharger kit for the Ford F-150, which it partnered with Whipple to create.​



This is official confirmation from what's been circling around since 7/14. I say that because Jim Farley seemed to suggest on a recent podcast that custom tuning would be available, but that's clear now that he was probably referring to Ford's closes aftermarket partners - Shelby, Roush, Saleen, etc.

With that said, I believe Ford should offer a custom tuning initiative whereby any shop can request to become a certified tuner as long as they meet X requirements. It's clear that Ford's new cars have to be locked down for cybersecurity reasons due in large part to over the air updates. Why can't third party shops request clearance along the lines of Shelby, etc. to allow them to tune S650? Food for thought.
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OppoLock

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Nothing’s uncrackable but modern-day locked ECUs have been taking upwards of 1-2 years before being cracked. Aftermarket tunes will probably be bare for awhile.

It’s taken the VAG crowd a full 2 years to crack the EA888 Gen IV in the MK8 Golfs despite it being extremely similar to the Gen III in the MK7s.

Same with the C8’s ECU. Released over 2 years ago and is “supposedly” cracked by at least one company while others are still working on it.
 

Classic Lover

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Nothing’s uncrackable but modern-day locked ECUs have been taking upwards of 1-2 years before being cracked. Aftermarket tunes will probably be bare for awhile.

It’s taken the VAG crowd a full 2 years to crack the EA888 Gen IV in the MK8 Golfs despite it being extremely similar to the Gen III in the MK7s.

Same with the C8’s ECU. Released over 2 years ago and is “supposedly” cracked by at least one company while others are still working on it.
Maybe so but with the car constantly being connected and with over the air updates it will likely be a real problem to tune these cars. These updates will likely flash the car back to stock if it’s tuned by an aftermarket that ford doesn’t approve for the car.

I hope I’m wrong.
 
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because_murica

because_murica

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Maybe so but with the car constantly being connected and with over the air updates it will likely be a real problem to tune these cars. These updates will likely flash the car back to stock if it’s tuned by an aftermarket that ford doesn’t approve for the car.

I hope I’m wrong.
Even if updates flash calibrations back to stock, you would still likely have to manually approve each update before it downloads and installs, like you do on the C8. So, it would be up to the owner if they want to keep their car up to date with Ford's updates for navigations, bug fixes, etc. - or keep their car running a custom tune.
 
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because_murica

because_murica

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The bitter irony of Ford's new Fully-Networked Vehicle (FNV) electrical architecture is that it touts cybersecurity as a main reason for its implementation - when, really, the best thing they could do for cybersecurity is NOT have a car connected to a nationwide or worldwide network.

This shit is like Sky Net for cars 😂
 


Mike Pfeifer

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Seems like as said above, the best approach to “keep the peace” with mustang fans would be to have a certification program where third party tuners can apply to be certified for access. A few disclaimers and statements about what consequences and ramifications can be expected with signatures should be all it takes to make it all good with the lawyers.
 

9secondko

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Seems like as said above, the best approach to “keep the peace” with mustang fans would be to have a certification program where third party tuners can apply to be certified for access. A few disclaimers and statements about what consequences and ramifications can be expected with signatures should be all it takes to make it all good with the lawyers.
perfect solution. Simple too - apart from agendas getting in the way.
 

DRB

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The bitter irony of Ford's new Fully-Networked Vehicle (FNV) electrical architecture is that it touts cybersecurity as a main reason for its implementation - when, really, the best thing they could do for cybersecurity is NOT have a car connected to a nationwide or worldwide network.

This shit is like Sky Net for cars 😂
The first time Sync asks me if I'm Sarah Connor I'm buying a Camaro.
 

Bikeman315

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The bitter irony of Ford's new Fully-Networked Vehicle (FNV) electrical architecture is that it touts cybersecurity as a main reason for its implementation - when, really, the best thing they could do for cybersecurity is NOT have a car connected to a nationwide or worldwide network.

This shit is like Sky Net for cars 😂
Here’s the part I do not get. We are all personally connected to a worldwide network. It’s called the internet. So why this insane concern about our cars. Privacy is a myth. Once we realize that connected cars will no longer be an issue.
 

Bikeman315

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Seems like as said above, the best approach to “keep the peace” with mustang fans would be to have a certification program where third party tuners can apply to be certified for access. A few disclaimers and statements about what consequences and ramifications can be expected with signatures should be all it takes to make it all good with the lawyers.
This is a great idea but at what cost to the tuners. Back when I worked for Panasonic’s business telephone division we had two types of system’s. Analog systems that could be bought and installed by anyone and digital systems that required certification. This entailed a three day class at a Panasonic location and cost I think around $800.00. For a lot of dealers it was worth the time and money, there’s not so much.

For the larger tuners, Lund, Livernois, and PBD it may be worth it. For your local guy maybe not. Also, we know that tune improvements for the Gen 3 engine were minimal without E85. We will have to wait and see what a tune for a S650 looks like.
 

Genxer

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It’s good for Ford. They will have more exclusivity with tunes/upgrades and less people tampering with their cars. Often, aftermarket solutions are hokey and questionable in regard to passing inspections. The federal govt is taking “for off-road use only” more serious, and it won’t get any better in the future for cowboy modders. I can see a future where we will either have a factory performance upgrade or a “certified” (CARB approved or the like) kitted solution by a third party. But that is only as long as we are burning fuel. With EVs, end-user emissions concerns go away. As long as we are using gasoline there will always be people who will find a way to skirt regulations because ‘Murica. Way back in the 1980s, magazine writers even then were talking about modding coming to an end but the aftermarket endured, because people who want to make money are clever. But now, the feds are getting more punitive. How many tuners will continue to stick their necks out?
 

zstanny

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Nothing to lose sleep over. These cars are quite capable as they come. Get good and familiar with it while the aftermarket takes 1-2 years to crack it, if you even care to tune it.
 
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young at heart

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Here’s what it’s quickly coming down to: buy what you want and think you’ll need when you first purchase your car because you aren’t gonna get any more. Get used to the idea!

Signed,

Captain Obvious
 

BrianJ77

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I'm not going to be the one to drag my S650 or run it on a road course. For me the stock 500ish HP Ford is putting in the Coyote will be plenty. I appreciate the idea that Ford may work with tuners in the future to allow other Mustang owners the capability to tune their cars, but this isn't something I worry about. This will definitely not deter me from being one of the first at my local dealer ordering my '24 Mustang Dark Horse.
 

IPOGT

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Here’s the part I do not get. We are all personally connected to a worldwide network. It’s called the internet. So why this insane concern about our cars. Privacy is a myth. Once we realize that connected cars will no longer be an issue.
It’s not all about privacy…. I’m in technology for the past (lots of) years. This isn’t good for reasons we haven’t even thought of yet…..Everything you own is becoming exploitable which is dangerous.
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