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Falc'man

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5.4 is such a nice number, innit. I agree with @93-Oct Mayne - more cubes are wlcome for a fatter curve.

I'm hoping it's that considering it'll most likely be the last V8 😞
 

Gogoggansgo

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Ford can’t make a big bore coyote because bore spacing is maxed out at 100mm at the factory level. It would require a new engine or a huge increase in stroke which would result in the engine having the 5.4 piston speed related issues that we saw back in the day. The way forward would be to just keep evolving the engine with better heads, better cams, higher redline. We could get a 500-525hp coyote without much issue
 

Red65

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Ford can’t make a big bore coyote because bore spacing is maxed out at 100mm at the factory level. It would require a new engine or a huge increase in stroke which would result in the engine having the 5.4 piston speed related issues that we saw back in the day. The way forward would be to just keep evolving the engine with better heads, better cams, higher redline. We could get a 500-525hp coyote without much issue
True, the rod ratio of a 3.84 stroke crank (ratio = 1.5) would start leaning towards the low end of the range that most engine builders are comfortable with. Not outside of it but still not optimal. Still, there's plenty of engines out there with worse rod ratios worse than that and can still run high rpm. It'll cause some issues with boost and long-term wear for sure. Given that the Australia Supercar series is focused big time on long term durability of these new Gen 3 engines, I'm curious what they did to combat these issues, or if the issues don't seem to affect them in their use.
 

shogun32

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Given that the Australia Supercar series is focused big time on long term durability of these new Gen 3 engines, I'm curious what they did to combat these issues
durability in racing context is something very divorced from DD use. If the previous engine could last say 3 weekends, that it can now (realistic?) last as low as 5 or even 7 weekends is a HUGE reduction in expense. And since it's also production-derived the parts are cheap as chips to boot.

Watching their races (3 events a weekend?) the circuits strike me as tight/slow so not a lot of long-duration high RPM operation.
 

Red65

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durability in racing context is something very divorced from DD use. If the previous engine could last say 3 weekends, that it can now (realistic?) last as low as 5 or even 7 weekends is a HUGE reduction in expense. And since it's also production-derived the parts are cheap as chips to boot.

Watching their races (3 events a weekend?) the circuits strike me as tight/slow so not a lot of long-duration high RPM operation.
Yea, which is why I said it may not be an issue in their use. Also, Mount Panorma has one of the fastest straights in circuit tracks in the world, about 1.2 miles long with a pretty significant downhill start. Pretty common to have sustained high rpm in that section. The Mountain Straight is also decently long and it’s pretty hard on the engines being uphill
 

thePill

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Let’s do a 4.4 V8 to keep the MSRP under $40,000 on the base GT’s and a 5.5 V8 for the base engine for the GT350, GT500 and all Special Model GT’s. A 4.4 option for $39,995 and the mostly Premium trim 5.5 GT for $44,995 to meet the max V8 engine size in IMSA without waiver.

This would be the first time in history that Ford would change the exterior, interior and drivetrain in a single Model Year.
 

Hack

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The Aluminator doesn't have to meet emissions or longevity requirements. For 2.5x the price of a crate Coyote v3 you too could build a 8500-9000 rpm Gen3
Are you saying that the racing version of the engine will have to meet longevity and emissions requirements for a passenger car?

I think it's entirely reasonable that a racing version of a 5.0 Coyote could make 600 HP. Look at what Nascar does with 5.7 pushrod engines - something north of 750 hp.

Ford can’t make a big bore coyote because bore spacing is maxed out at 100mm at the factory level. It would require a new engine or a huge increase in stroke which would result in the engine having the 5.4 piston speed related issues that we saw back in the day. The way forward would be to just keep evolving the engine with better heads, better cams, higher redline. We could get a 500-525hp coyote without much issue
They can make a bigger bore engine but they would have to change everything . They could use some other past engine like the Raptor's 6.2 with Coyote style heads, or just start from scratch. It's really not a big investment compared to all the warranty claims they might end up with if they try to push the Coyote too far without increasing c.i.
 

Falc'man

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The 5.0 can easily do 600hp from factory. They were capable of that in 2013/4 with voodoo but went for the cheaper internals as 600hp was overkill for a $49,990 sticker. Chev have only matched Gen 3's volumetric efficiency, so don't be fooled by the LT6's high hp number. Yes, it's a big number, but coyote would do the same if Ford threw exotic, lightweight materials at it. Or in it.
 
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Are we talking about the same Ford motor company here? Just look at the Mach 1, they could have made a real Coyote based successor to the GT350 but just went for the bullitt engine setup. I don't think Ford will go all in on horsepower here. They will sell the GT internationally, so it at least somehow be able to fit strict emission laws. I highly doubt it will gain displacement, I could much more see a slight reduction in displacement that can be paired with Hybrid technology for a GT-E like model.

I am also expecting only a slight horsepower increase, it will mostly gain better performance numbers as a hybrid, but not in raw horsepower numbers.

Ford was recently spied testing a ZL1 again, could be interesting what Mustang model that got that for
 

Chomperr

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It seems everywhere I go these days the streets are packed. Lots of stop and go. I’ll also start having to commute to work again after my company has had us working from home for the last couple years.

I’d love some more low end torque. I don’t even care if the HP stays the same or goes up much.
 
 
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