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First Time Driving Cars Fast On A Track

BoostRabbitGT

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Earlier today I got a chance to drive both a Porsche 992 GT3 and a Mercedes AMG GT R for a few laps each at SpeedVegas/Exotics Racing. It was my first time ever driving on a track. On the one hand I liked finally experiencing what it's like to go all-out (as much as a newcomer can, anyways) on cars meant to go all-out on straights and turns. I definitely enjoyed the cars themselves (shockingly I liked the GT R more than the 992 despite the Porsche having more precise steering input and feel).

Unfortunately, I think the nausea during and afterwards was enough to deter me from pursuing it more actively in the nearby future. I'm no Lewis Hamilton by any means, and definitely not Max Verstappen even more so. I think in the grand scheme of things I enjoy cars at the speed limit, +5mph absolutely tops if I can help it. Boring I know. Pathetic I'm aware. I can handle highway speeds just fine, I just need infinitely more experience driving on said highways more than anything at this point (I have practically next to none 😅).

Now then, my latest set of questions for anyone willing to help my insane self out:

1. Can you enjoy driving a car spiritedly within the speed limits with less than 200hp? More to the point, can you merge on the highway and pass others reasonably quickly with a car that has less than 200hp?

2. If I were to try track driving again, how do I battle the nausea before, during, and/or after the experience? Or is it just something that you have to just build resilience with each different time you go?

I guess that's all I've got for now. Looking forward to hearing from others. Thank you!

 

DeluxeStang

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Earlier today I got a chance to drive both a Porsche 992 GT3 and a Mercedes AMG GT R for a few laps each at SpeedVegas/Exotics Racing. It was my first time ever driving on a track. On the one hand I liked finally experiencing what it's like to go all-out (as much as a newcomer can, anyways) on cars meant to go all-out on straights and turns. I definitely enjoyed the cars themselves (shockingly I liked the GT R more than the 992 despite the Porsche having more precise steering input and feel).

Unfortunately, I think the nausea during and afterwards was enough to deter me from pursuing it more actively in the nearby future. I'm no Lewis Hamilton by any means, and definitely not Max Verstappen even more so. I think in the grand scheme of things I enjoy cars at the speed limit, +5mph absolutely tops if I can help it. Boring I know. Pathetic I'm aware. I can handle highway speeds just fine, I just need infinitely more experience driving on said highways more than anything at this point (I have practically next to none 😅).

Now then, my latest set of questions for anyone willing to help my insane self out:

1. Can you enjoy driving a car spiritedly within the speed limits with less than 200hp? More to the point, can you merge on the highway and pass others reasonably quickly with a car that has less than 200hp?

2. If I were to try track driving again, how do I battle the nausea before, during, and/or after the experience? Or is it just something that you have to just build resilience with each different time you go?

I guess that's all I've got for now. Looking forward to hearing from others. Thank you!
Regarding the nausea question, I think it's a combination of building up a tolerance and diet. If I'm remembering correctly, most race teams have professional chefs who created meals with ingredients that counter motion sickness.
 

zstanny

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Power to weight my dude. 200HP 2 seater can be a very different feel than a 200HP 4 seater. Be a little more specific and we can help ya better.

There are so many factors with the nausea. Like Deluxstang said, diet. I wouldn't have a heavy meal prior. Watch your caffeine intake - don't go without if you are a normal user, but don't chug 200MG 5 minutes before. Make sure you're hydrated.

Also, sinuses. Were you stuffy that day? Runny nose? Sounds trivial, but sinus issues can migrate to inner ear, which can affect balance, vertigo, nausea.

Unless you just violently vommed everywhere, I would 100% give it another go. Eat your wheaties, have ONE cup of coffee, some water, and take an allegra :crackup:




Earlier today I got a chance to drive both a Porsche 992 GT3 and a Mercedes AMG GT R for a few laps each at SpeedVegas/Exotics Racing. It was my first time ever driving on a track. On the one hand I liked finally experiencing what it's like to go all-out (as much as a newcomer can, anyways) on cars meant to go all-out on straights and turns. I definitely enjoyed the cars themselves (shockingly I liked the GT R more than the 992 despite the Porsche having more precise steering input and feel).

Unfortunately, I think the nausea during and afterwards was enough to deter me from pursuing it more actively in the nearby future. I'm no Lewis Hamilton by any means, and definitely not Max Verstappen even more so. I think in the grand scheme of things I enjoy cars at the speed limit, +5mph absolutely tops if I can help it. Boring I know. Pathetic I'm aware. I can handle highway speeds just fine, I just need infinitely more experience driving on said highways more than anything at this point (I have practically next to none 😅).

Now then, my latest set of questions for anyone willing to help my insane self out:

1. Can you enjoy driving a car spiritedly within the speed limits with less than 200hp? More to the point, can you merge on the highway and pass others reasonably quickly with a car that has less than 200hp?

2. If I were to try track driving again, how do I battle the nausea before, during, and/or after the experience? Or is it just something that you have to just build resilience with each different time you go?

I guess that's all I've got for now. Looking forward to hearing from others. Thank you!
 

shogun32

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I think the nausea during and afterwards was enough
look further ahead.

2 eggs, a bit of toast and water. not coffee or orange juice.

true-story. I about puked into my oxygen mask after 15 minutes of doing light acrobatics (first time flying a plane, rolls, hammerhead, upside down etc) when we were flying level and steady on final approach in the suddenly oppressive heat. During all the yanking and banking I couldn't have been happier or stomach perfectly fine.

looking WAY ahead also takes the 'fright' out of roller-coasters too.
 
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BoostRabbitGT

BoostRabbitGT

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Thanks everyone for your responses. Where to start from here...

The car in question would be the newly debuted 2023 Toyota Prius with 196HP/AWD. Alternatively I'd be looking at the most recent Mazda 3 hatchback with AWD and without the turbocharged engine.

Either one of those two, or a S650 Mustang GT which definitely doesn't fall under the sub-200hp umbrella. 😅 (I still can't believe I enjoyed the AMG GT R more than the 992 GT3. Alas, I don't think I'll ever earn enough to afford those types of cars.)

I appreciate the focus and diet tips. Like I said, I'm in no rush to return to the track, but I will make sure to eat lighter and look further out the next time I find myself out there.

(Fingers crossed Forza Motorsport [2023] is just as good if not better than Forza Motorsport 4...)
 


shogun32

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The car in question would be the newly debuted 2023 Toyota Prius with 196HP/AWD
I would have serious questions about it's suspension and choice of rubber. Plus I would expect it'll go into limp mode after a lap or two. Try the GR Yaris instead.
 
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BoostRabbitGT

BoostRabbitGT

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I would have serious questions about it's suspension and choice of rubber. Plus I would expect it'll go into limp mode after a lap or two. Try the GR Yaris instead.
Sorry, I should've clarified that the 200hp-and-under cars I'm considering for my next car would NOT be track-driven. For those, I'm just wondering if they can be enjoyed at typical speed limit levels and slightly above. Maybe take a traffic light right turn a little more spiritedly than typical, that kind of daily driving stuff.

(The track-driven cars would be one's at Mustang GT levels of horsepower and above...)
 

shogun32

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Maybe take a traffic light right turn a little more spiritedly than typical, that kind of daily driving stuff.
any car even a Honda CRX can do silly exciting stuff on the road. I'll bet there is a sub-forum for Prius drag racing and aftermarket suspension tuning.
 

Ewheels

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I don't think I have ever heard "Prius" and "track driving" even within neighboring sentences before.
Why not get a regular Civic. That meets your daily driver criteria but there's still a very good aftermarket for them. You can modify it to handle like something way above it's price range.
 
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BoostRabbitGT

BoostRabbitGT

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I don't think I have ever heard "Prius" and "track driving" even within neighboring sentences before.
Why not get a regular Civic. That meets your daily driver criteria but there's still a very good aftermarket for them. You can modify it to handle like something way above it's price range.
🙃

Simple answer is the Civic doesn't interest me. And I've no interest in modding my daily driver, at least not right away, if ever. I will say this though, if the new Prius has driving dynamics like the Civic Si and still get 50+ MPG overall, I think Toyota will have a real winner on their hands without getting in the way of the GR86, GR Corolla, or GR Supra.
 

Biggus Dickus

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2. If I were to try track driving again, how do I battle the nausea before, during, and/or after the experience? Or is it just something that you have to just build resilience with each different time you go?
Assuming you have no vestibular disease / inner ear problems, there are few things you can do.

Eating well and being hydrated is good advice, but I doubt will make much of a difference with motion sickness. Remember, the stimuli for nausea in this case comes from the inner ear - not the gut.

The only medication that can help and NOT make you drowsy are amphetamines - scopolamine and first gen antihistamines afterwards will help, but make you drowsy (not a good solution before you go out on track.

"Habituation", which is what military pilots do, is only effective with at least weekly exposure to what makes you sick.

Maybe focusing as far out on the track as possible (and not the track right in front of you) might help.

Good luck.
 

 
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